Growing computer recycler relocates to meet demand

Written by Peter Davison on .

 

Richard Paget Chris Graham Carolyn Wilson Simon Crisp Marie Crisp and Jake Morrison of Green MachineRichard Paget Chris Graham Carolyn Wilson Simon Crisp Marie Crisp and Jake Morrison of Green MachineComputer repair and recycling firm Green Machine has relocated to larger premises and is taking on new staff to meet a growing demand for its services.

The company has moved to premises at Whittonditch Works, near Ramsbury, which provides ample space for storage, a repair workshop, office space, and a training room.

Green Machine was founded just over three years ago by Simon Crisp, after he lost his job as an IT consultant with computer giant IBM.

Frustrated by the way that large firms dispose of PCs and laptops which are better than many people have at home, Simon started collecting unwanted computers, wiping the hard-drives, refurbishing them and offering them on as low-cost computers – whilst helping firms comply with recycling and data protection legislation, and keeping IT equipment out of landfill.

Since 2012, the business has diversified: recycling computers on behalf of members of the public, fixing computers when they go wrong, offering a data retrieval service for people with broken PCs and laptops, and even addressing the IT needs of schools for a fraction of the cost charged by the commercial giants in the industry.

At the heart of the business was a desire to be a force for good in the community, and that remains a focus for Green Machine. A percentage of the profits from computer recycling go to local, national and international charities, ranging from Transition Marlborough and Prospect Hospice to Help For Heroes and Cancer Research UK.

Training and employing young people is also key to the Green Machine story. The firm currently employs six people and is on the hunt for two apprentice IT technicians, while the training room will provide a centre for teaching young people skills ranging from touch typing to computer programming.

“From unemployment to running a business employing six people, the first three years has been an incredible journey,” said Simon. “We are looking forward to growing further over the next three years while remaining true to our original ethos: to breathe new life into old IT, and to do some good in our community.”

For more information about Green Machine’s products and services, log on to www.green-machine.org

 

 

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