News dot2left cropped500pxt
  • Jazz Fest Sat 572
  • Christmas-Lights 15-11-20 097
  • IMG 9097-2
  • TdB-Pewsey 044
  • Torch-2012-05-23 093-
  • Civic Selfie1
  • Landscape
  • IMG 8472-2
  • Hares 017cropped
  • Xmas-Lights-2011-11-24 10
  • D4S0472
  • Silbury-Sunset---10-06-08-----07-2
  • Mop-Fair---10-10-09------08
  • MYFC 005
  • Town-Hall-2011-05-03 08-2
  • D4S9273
  • Marlborough-2013-04-18 St Peters-2
  • D812668
  • 4MI-2013-11-28 030
  • Sunset2
  • Bluebells-in-West-Woods-10-05-09------30
  • ARK Manton -2012-01-14 49-
  • Camilla-2012-10-19 152
  • Big-Bull
  • Duke-of-Kent 086

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

News

Wiltshire Council plans for a big increase in Marlborough’s elderly and shakes-up current services

The Marlborough Area Board heard this week how Wiltshire Council is shaking up the provision for the care of Marlborough’s elderly.  The Board was also told about longer term plans to provide new, improved and expanded services and accommodation for the fast increasing numbers of elderly – especially the vulnerable elderly and those with dementia.

By 2026 Wiltshire will see a fifty-five per cent rise in the number of its population who are over sixty-five; an eighty-nine per cent increase in those over eighty-five; and a fifty-nine per cent increase in those suffering from with dementia.

Under plans being implemented now, the Council is moving toward single suppliers for care of the elderly.  This means that The Priory in Marlborough High Street, with its twenty-three flats, will continue to be owned and maintained by the Sarsen Housing Association, but its staff and services will transfer to the Leonard Cheshire organisation which is taking over care services for the Marlborough area.

Why have the Council taken this route?  Across Wiltshire there are 120 home care organisations – with three serving the Marlborough area.  And that 120 is being cut to just four organisations.  Across the county there are twenty organisations providing housing support – with twelve operating in our area.  Across the county there are six organisations supplying special equipment to the elderly – soon there will be just one.

The aim is produce a better service for the elderly and save money which will be reinvested in the services.  The Council wants to reduce wastage from duplication and make savings from economies of scale.

However, John Thomson, Wiltshire Council’s cabinet representative for adult care, communities and housing, has told Marlborough News Online that this severe rationalisation “will not take any funding away from local charities – in fact it may increase their funding.  The organisations we have chosen to run these services are actively encouraged to make use of local charities.”

There is much more in this programme - called “Helping people to stay at home” -  to improve the lives of Marlborough’s present population of older people including a twenty-four hour ‘Telecare’ service.  Once it’s up and running, calls from older people seeking urgent help or advice will be answered by people based in Wiltshire rather than by answerphones or far-flung call centres.

Looking further ahead, the Council’s “Older people accommodation development strategy” will see a new purpose-built sixteen bed nursing wing built at Coombe End Court for people with dementia. Also a new forty-five unit extra care centre will be built in the town.  This will have a 24/7 care and support team and plenty of facilities – including a café, hairdressing suite and an IT room. It will also be open as a drop-in centre.

No site has been chosen for this new complex and building may not start till 2013-14. But the project managers are keen to take local views into account during the planning, design and tendering process and Councillor Jemima Milton offered the services of the  Marlborough area Health Forum to take on this role.  Volunteers are needed to assist the Forum.

Across the whole county, the Council plans 715 new extra care units, 338 specialist dementia care placements and 539 additional nursing beds for the elderly.  It’s calculated that this programme will, over twenty years, avoid £600million in costs the Council would have faced if they had nothing to plan for the rising population of older people.

Print Email

The Euro is going to continue to struggle for a long time, warns Claire Perry

EXCLUSIVE: By Gerald Isaaman

The Euro is going to continue to struggle as a currency whatever happens within the Eurozone to save it, according to Tory MP Claire Perry, a former banker before she entered parliamentary politics at the last election.

She announced this before the latest decision of Greece to hold a referendum on whether to accept the EU’s latest plans.  Stock markets are now reacting negatively as they may well have done had a referendum vote in the UK gone ahead.

“My personal view rather than official policy is that I can’t see how you can reconcile the different growth rates, the fiscal situations of 17 countries with a single currency and with the current level of the lack of alignment between the political and financial institutions,” she told Marlborough News Online.

“Issuing things like Euro bonds will clearly be very helpful but, in order to do that, you have to have the European Central Bank to underwrite the economies.  And you won’t get that without stronger fiscal arrangements.”

“So the Euro is going to continue to struggle for some time to come.  I do think that unless Greece exits the EU, it will be a struggle.”

The MP for Marlborough is equally convinced that people shouldn’t under-estimate the “healthy level of Euro-scepticism at the top of the government,” despite David Cameron’s insistence not to desert the “burning building” and so upset his growing number of backbench rebels.

William Haig’s never, never, never to the Euro is one example, she points out, and she adds: “I love the story of Cameron going in and being show this glossy brochure for an expensive new headquarters for the European Council, saying, ‘What on earth are you thinking – this is complete rubbish?'”

“I can't imagine previous prime ministers doing that,” she says. “And George Osborne is very practical and understands that not only is it wrong but also that the more the Eurozone can keep looking to peripheral members for funding – and remember that Britain is one of the largest net contributors to the EU – then the less imperative there is for them to sort themselves out.”

Mrs Perry, now 47 and PPS to Philip Hammond at the Ministry of Defence, has her own examples of “gravy train waste” as a member of the delegation to the European Council and attacks too the lack of democratic response when some EU institutions are criticised.

“I made a speech criticising the Court of Human Rights on the issue of prisoner voting rights,” she explains. “Look, Winston Churchill set up the Court of Human Rights, it’s a wonderful thing, the principles of that are so important.

“But it was like I had created an international incident because no-one has ever criticised the Court before.”

She believes the government must promote a relentless drive for growth, wiping out red tape and whatever else is stifling business growth, and is convinced that the money freed up by reducing VAT would be spent on Chinese-made iPods for Christmas rather the generation of employment.

Nevertheless, she is unaware, as are most MPs, that Nick Clegg is preparing for a second round of the coalition agreement, revealing in a new book: “This is the big debate in the coalition.  That discussions will be more fraught than the original coalition agreement.  It will be a real fork in the road.  Both parties have a very different tax stance and a different spending stance.”

Clegg intends to drive a hard bargain and having already drawn up a list of demands is now in a strong position, the backbench Tories in revolt emphasising Cameron's undoubted need of the Lib-Dems to keep him in power.

Mrs Perry recognises that too and believes the coalition will last, her view being that it is frustration more than anything else that has brought about the backbench upsurge, not David Cameron’s Etonian style, as some have claimed.

She received far fewer demands for an EU referendum than she did protests over earlier government proposals to sell off forests like Savernake.

She believes too in Osborne’s bid to prevent any UK money contributed to the IMF being transferred to the Eurozone, though has not heard that Labour may have a secret weapon in this quarter.  The husband of their rising Treasury spokeswoman, Rachel Reeves, is a high-flying IMF official, Nick Joicey, whom she met when she worked for the Bank of England in Washington.

“I believe the coalition will last because there is a fundamental agreement on the most important thing, which is the British economy,” she declares.  “This is regardless of any second coalition agreement, which I didn’t know about.  When you talk to cabinet ministers they are all singing from the same hymn sheet – but it’s just that they are not always harmonising.”

If you have any comment on this or any other story published on Marlborough News Online,
please click below and send e-mail in letter format to the following address:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Details of identity – a home or business address - is
required, though not necessarily for full publication

Print Email

Bishop of Salisbury enters the escalating row over Marlborough’s Ivy House Hotel

EXCLUSIVE: By Gerald Isaaman

The newly-enthroned Bishop of Salisbury has stepped into the escalating row between Marlborough College and the town over its proposed £1.8 million purchase of the grade II listed Ivy House Hotel as a permanent hostel for girl students.

The Rt Rev Nick Holtam’s (pictured) appointment as Bishop automatically made him president of the council of the governors of the college, whose move to buy the 28-room hotel has created a major rift between the town and college and resulted in the threat of legal action.

Bishop Holtam has now revealed that he is looking into the situation, having done so in response to a plea from retired company director Gordon Olson, who has made an official complaint alleging bias against government planning inspector Paul Jackson, who granted the college change of use consent for the hotel to become a hostel.

“He has politely acknowledged a letter I sent him expressing my disquiet and said he will look into the situation,” Mr Olson told Marlborough News Online.

“It is a start and I look forward to hearing more from him. We shall have to wait now and see what happens given that Sir John Sykes has also written to him.”

Mr Olson’s two sons were pupils at the college, which includes among its former female students the Duchess of Cambridge, the daughters of the Duke of York, and the wives of David Cameron, George Osborne and Speaker John Bercow.

So was one of the sons of retired solicitor Sir John Sykes (pictured), who wrote last week to Bishop Holtham, formerly vicar of St Martin’s in the Field, in London, urging him to persuade the college governors to “withdraw from the purchase” of the hotel.
Sir John Sykes, chairman of the Merchants House Trust

He wrote in his capacity as chairman of Marlborough’s Merchants House Trust, vice-chairman of the Marlborough Literary Festival, and a long term resident.

Sir John’s letter says the planning appeal was granted “despite the combined opposition of both Wiltshire Council and Marlborough Town Council, together with the Marlborough Chamber of Commerce, both the Jazz and Literature Festivals, as well as  numerous individuals including Mr Robert Hiscox, the High Sheriff of Wiltshire.”  

He points out: “Cogent arguments were submitted against change of use on grounds of the great harm which will result to the tourist trade and the town’s economy.”

Then he adds: “Legal action is now being contemplated to prevent the college’s plans going ahead.  As a retired solicitor I believe there are substantial grounds for such action and the college could find itself mired in a long drawn-out, expensive and acrimonious argument.”

“The loss of the hotel will undoubtedly not only affect the future of tourism to the town and the surrounding area but also I fear create a rift between town and gown that will be harmful both to Marlborough and its much valued college.”

“I appreciate that you have been on the local scene for only a short time, but your investigation into the circumstances of the hotel purchase and intervention at this stage will, I hope, ensure that the governors reconsider their decision and withdraw from the purchase.”

If you have any comment on this or any other story published on Marlborough News Online,
please click below and send e-mail in letter format to the following address:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Details of identity – a home or business address - is
required, though not necessarily for full publication

Print Email

It’s deeply insulting to say I got the job because I am a woman, says MP Claire

EXCLUSIVE by Gerald Isaaman

It’s an armour-plated world that Claire Perry now lives in.  No sooner had she received a surprise phone call from David Cameron with news of preferment than she found herself conveyed to the Ministry of Defence in an armoured vehicle flanked by security men for protection.

Such is the high security that she found herself with only a VIP pass, not a permanent one, and will still be working in her Commons office in her new role as Parliamentary Private Secretary to Philip Hammond, who has taken over from the departed Dr Liam Fox.

And despite the added responsibilities she has now, the Tory MP for Marlborough, in the constituency of Devizes, it is an unpaid post – and Claire a somewhat reluctant Iron Maiden helping to control the nation’s defences and the war against the Taliban in Afghanistan.

“I realised there was going to be a mini reshuffle when Liam stood down,” she says.  “But I literally had no expectations whatsoever that I would be given a job.”

“That’s partly because being a PPS is not a necessary step in order to get promoted and, frankly, I was quite happy being a busy backbencher looking after the constituency and working on campaigns as I have been doing.”

“So when the first changes came out, I thought that was great.  I applauded those who had got their jobs and it was good to see some women getting into prominent positions, very good, that’s fine, I thought.”

And elegantly tall Claire adds: “I don’t know if I was the best candidate for this mini-promotion.  I shall certainly give it my best shot.  And the suggestion that it has just been done because I am a woman I find deeply insulting.”

“There were five promotions.  Three went to women and two went to men.  It’s not like it’s a clean sweep.  I mean how insulting it is to say so.”

“But that’s just the negative stuff that plays today . I think the right thing about your profession, please forgive me Gerald, is just to ignore it.”

That is hardly an option when the headlines are overflowing with tales of the Tory backbench revolt over Europe, the EU’s brave bid to defeat the Euro crisis and the clash between David Cameron and Nick Clegg over the coalition’s response to last week’s momentous events.

(Separate report to follow: The Tories will take the Euro hard line…).

She recognises that Dr Fox did a “very good job” at the MoD with a strategic defence review that slashed billions off its budget and she refuses to cast aspersions as to the deficiencies that resulted in his resignation following the revelations about his close friendship with Adam Werritty.

She is pleased to be working with Philip Hammond, whom she worked with when he was shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury.  “It is really a fantastic time to be joining the team,” she insists.

And it is appropriate too since she has 10,500 soldiers in her Devizes constituency, which has kept her involved in military matters, among them her campaign for the armed forces to be fed with British pork instead of cheap Dutch and Danish bacon, which she can now promote from the inside.

Indeed, she is very much a favourite in the local army camps, the more so after her sexual brush in the Commons tearoom with Speaker John Bercow, which she declares was not a barrier to earlier promotion. “They thought it was a hoot,” she says.

Nevertheless, there is a firm clamp on her speaking openly about her new role.  “I’ve been told that the enemy uses high technology that can hack into people’s phones,” she reveals.  “You have to be very careful about what you say.  All the high security protocols have come into play.”

Print Email

High street woes? Don’t blame parking charges says Wiltshire Council report

On Tuesday, 8 November the full Wiltshire Council meeting in Salisbury City Hall will discuss a new report: “Countywide analysis of the impact of car parking charges.”  This report comes after the widespread controversy over the increases to parking charges made in April 2011 and the council’s U-turn on the abolition of Salisbury’s one-hour parking rate.

The report – with a mass of back-up appendices, charts and tables – sets out to examine the link between car park usage in the context of the current economic climate and the introduction of Wiltshire’s new car parking strategy and new charges.  It comes to the unsurprising conclusion that increased charges have not affected the number of people using car parks so they can shop in the county’s high streets.

The report cites ‘wider research’ that “what a town or city has to offer is the primary factor affecting economic health and not parking charges.”  And points out that sales of parking tickets were in decline before the charges were increased in April 2011.

Apart from the economy’s ‘slow growth’, other factors producing poorer retail sales from town centre shops include the rise of internet shopping, of out-of-town shopping centres, of chain stores and of supermarkets - the usual suspects.

The increase in charges in April was part of the unitary authority’s policy to harmonise charges across the county.  However, it is quite apparent that the charges were ‘harmonised up’ rather than ‘harmonised down’.

Charges rose towards Marlborough’s high level of charges, rather than being brought down to meet Corsham and Wootton Bassett’s pre-April charges of 20p for one hour and £1.00 for two hours.  Indeed Marlborough’s one and two-hour charges are still higher than Council’s declared Band 3 charges of 40p for one hour and £1.20 for two hours – the Band it says Marlborough should be in.

The total income from car parks in the county administered by Wiltshire Council was forecast in the budget for 2011-2012 to be £9,292,000 – before taking into account maintenance, wardens, emptying the ticket machines and so on.  And the new 2011 charges were expected to generate an extra £309,000 over this financial year.

But the year so far has seen a sharp downturn in the expected income.  There is an anticipated shortfall for the year of £540,000.  Of this figure £40,000 is down to the Council’s decision to re-introduce Salisbury’s one-hour charge.

Since April 2011, the use of Marlborough’s short stay (and in this case ‘short’ is considered by the Council as being up to four hours) parking has dropped by six per cent, with long stay dropping by three per cent.

Marlborough’s Waitrose car park

In Marlborough, the ‘Waitrose’ short-term car park causes some of the bitterest comments on pricing.  This car park is managed by the Council under a contract with Waitrose signed in June 2000.  The contract grants the Council the right to manage the car park and take the fees for twenty-five years – so it has fourteen more years to run.

The car park is to be run “for the primary use of shoppers.”  More specifically the agreement states that the Council must “use its best endeavours to impose a scale of charges on the public using the car parking spaces which will encourage short stay parking and discourage long stay parking.”

This means that if it wished, the Council could make the first hour’s parking free or 10p, so long as charges for subsequent hours discourage long-term parking.

How the Town Council could help

If the town council considers Marlborough is getting a bad deal on parking charges, it can continue to badger Wiltshire Council to reduce the town’s charges at least to the Band 3 level.  Or it could (as Warminster did prior to April 2011) buy from the county a free hour for a set number of parking spaces.

Alternatively, the town council could support financially, perhaps in conjunction with Waitrose or the Chamber of Commerce, a redemption scheme – like the one run at the Sainsbury’s car park in Devizes.  This entitles shoppers to a refund of their first hour’s parking charge if they spend a specified amount in one of the shops joining the scheme.

Earlier this year, a county-wide redemption scheme was proposed by Wiltshire Council.  But in July it was reported that “such a scheme may not be wanted by the retail trade in some areas.” And the Council is now consulting about a scheme with town councils, chambers of commerce, and other interested parties.

Wiltshire Council defends its parking charges on two main grounds – it needs to reduce CO2 emissions and meet air quality targets, and it needs the income to subsidise bus routes. It wants fewer cars on the roads and higher income from those that use its car parks.

Watch this space for a report that will try and find out how the bus subsidies work.
 

If you have any comment on this or any other story published on Marlborough News Online,
please click below and send e-mail in letter format to the following address:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Details of identity – a home or business address - is
required, though not necessarily for full publication

Print Email

Survey launched in bid to introduce pilot residents’ parking in Marlborough

Another bid to introduce a residents’ parking scheme in car clogged Marlborough is being made with the launch of a survey to discover whether people would support one.

More than 200 survey questionnaires have been delivered by CRAMP – Cars, Residents and Marlborough Parking – seeking their views and asking whether they would pay around £100 for an annual permit to park in their street.

And they have been distributed by Marlborough activist Val Compton and her neighbour Abby George (pictured) in the Kennet Place area, where Val originally asked Kennet District Council to consider such a parking scheme in 1996.

And it is an area where parking has resulted in slashed and let down tyres, frayed tempers and verbal abuse in the past as residents have fought to protect “their space”, adding urgency to the problem.

“Mention parking in Marlborough and everyone goes into eye rolling or rant mode – quite understandably,” says the CRAMP survey introduction. “It’s a pain.  So some of us have informally got together to try and sort it out under the name of CRAMP.”

“This is the first step to achieving a better system of parking for everyone – residents, workers and shoppers.  It’s taken a very long time to get to this point and we are now ready to launch a survey to establish support for a residents’ parking scheme.”

Val’s persistence has resulted in Wiltshire Council and Marlborough town council supporting the survey, the town council covering printing and some postage costs.  Initially it is for her own Kennet Place locality as a pilot operation but the aim is to cover the whole town using detailed maps that Wiltshire has provided.

“I now have to create several zones in Marlborough and survey each one,” explained Val.  “I need to see what problems arise and, if needed, to make any necessary alterations to the survey questionnaire to ensure that everyone has their say.

“I am hoping the Chamber of Commerce will start to quantify the workers’ parking required in Marlborough, though I haven’t re-opened discussions with them yet.  Paul Shimell, the new president, has plenty on his plate till the New Year.”

“But I think the Kennet Place car park, now standing half empty because of increased charges, would make the perfect place for low paid workers to park.”

“If every business employing people as volunteers or on the minimum wage could buy season tickets at the same sort of £100 rate as residents, then it would solve quite a problem.”

The current aim is to ensure the return of all the survey questionnaires, some 25 having already arrived and others going to the town council’s own offices.

“Then we can take the next step forward,” said Val. “It may be a long uphill climb to get this campaign to come to fruition but after 15 years -- and with the parking situation getting worse -- something has to give.”

Print Email

Town council sets £5,000 budget for the Queen’s diamond jubilee celebrations

Marlborough town council is to set a budget of £5,000 to pay for events celebrating the Queen’s diamond jubilee next year, which will include a contribution to a beacon on the downs to mark the occasion.

Some 1,800 beacons across the country and around the globe are planned to celebrate the Queen becoming only the second monarch in British history to complete 60 years on the throne.

“We had a similar budget for the royal wedding in April,” Councillor Andrew Ross, chairman of the council’s finance and policy committee, told Marlborough News Online.  “There has been no specific consideration yet as to the actual cost of the beacon.”

“But if it costs too much we won’t be able to do it unless some generous people in the town contribute towards the jubilee celebrations, just as they did for the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton.”

Print Email

Marlborough’s Jubilee Centre needs a cook and lots of volunteers

Once you’ve found the clock in Marlborough High Street, you’re just a step away from the Jubilee Centre – the town’s drop-in and day centre for people over sixty.  The centre welcomes plenty of older people who enjoy the care it gives them, but is short of volunteers to help look after them.

One of the centre’s great attractions is the lunch it serves every Wednesday and Thursday – not just to the people who come to spend the day at the centre, but to several older people who cannot resist a good, three-course lunch in friendly surroundings for a fiver.   But….the centre needs a part-time cook willing to work flexible hours and cook suitable, tasty and simple food.

Carole Walker, the centre’s leader, says the right cook will get to know some remarkable older people who come to the centre from many parts of the Marlborough area and get a great response from his or her cooking.

The Jubilee Centre was set-up in 1977 – the year of Queen Elizabeth’s silver jubilee.  Wiltshire Council provide half its annual costs, the rest comes from donations, fees and grants from charities.

Carole (seen left welcoming a drop-in visitor) is one of the four paid part-timers who run the centre.  She came to the area from South Africa in 2000 and has three grown-up daughters - one of them at university.  She fears that in the current economic climate, more people are having to take part-time jobs - and that means there are fewer people able and willing to volunteer.

As a day centre (on Mondays, Tuesday and Fridays) it can accommodate nineteen people – including two wheelchairs.  These days are for frailer people who have been referred to the centre by outside agencies.  Besides the meal, there’s coffee and teas, and either a talk or an entertainment.  And some of the older people will be taken for walks along the High Street by volunteers.

A major part of the work Carole and her team do is arranging transport to bring the elderly – and sometimes infirm – people to the centre from all over the area, and then take them safely home again.

Some use the Kennet and District Community Transport Group’s mini-bus – seen below delivering a wheelchair-bound drop-in visitor to the centre.  Otherwise the centre arranges a Link Scheme car or a taxi – and some a delivered by neighbours or family.

On drop-in days – Wednesdays and Thursdays – the centre can have up to forty elderly visitors during the day and provide thirty lunches.

Four times a year they arrange outings.  These are subsidised by the Wiltshire Community Foundation.  Tomorrow (Tuesday, 1 November), they’re going to the Manger Barn in Lacock where they’ll have an indoor picnic.

So, how can you help? By becoming a volunteer helper – by sponsoring events  – by providing stimulating talks or craft workshops – by sponsoring an outing or the newsletter.  For instance, the Kennet Pharmacy and the Marlborough Mobility Store are sponsoring the centre’s new leaflet.  Or by letting Carole know (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) about anyone you think might make the perfect cook for the centre.

In addition, 2012 will not just be Queen Elizabeth’s diamond jubilee, but will also be the Marlborough Jubilee Centre’s thirty-fifth birthday…and that calls for some good citizen to sponsor a really great party for the over 60’s

Print Email

St John’s School reaps the core photo prizes for Marlborough apple day

St John’s School pipped the competition to the post in the Marlborough Apple Day’s photographic competition with two of the eight winners being pupils at the school and a third being a St John’s teacher. 

The competition, which invited budding amateur photographers to take an apple-related photo in celebration of apples and orchards, received more than 100 entries.

The winners were announced at an award ceremony at St Mary’s Church today (Saturday) and received a Wiltshire variety of apple tree as part of their prize.

The first prize in the 16 years and under category went to Emily Rodriguez-Martin for her photo entitled "Apples on Parade" (main pic). Emily who lives in Axford is a pupil at St John's.  
    
'Apple Pile Up'
by Eleanor Woodley     'Cockrel in the Orchard'
by Jack Gradidge
 The adults’ category (over 17) was jointly won by Eleanor Woodley, from Chiseldon, who is also a pupil at St John’s, with her photo “Apple Pile-up” and Jack Gradidge, from Oare, with his photo entitled “Cockerel in the Orchard”.
 
Highly commended were Nick Barlow from Burbage, Carolyn Davis from Ogbourne St Andrew, Nicky Foy  from Wilton, and Max More from Marlborough, who is a music teacher at St John’s.

     
'Rotting Apples'
by Nicky Foy     'After The Rain'
by Nick Barlow     'Blossom'
by Caroline Davis

Chair of the judges, the eminent photographer and author Roger Phillips, described Emily’s photograph as “an outstanding compositional idea”, praised Eleanor's “excellent combination of colour and fruit”, and admired Jack's entry as “a stunning moment wonderfully captured”.

   'Beached Apples'
by Max More     'Green with Envy'
by Nicky Foy
All entries to the photographic competition will remain on display for all to see in St Mary's Church until next Friday (November 4). The winning photographs will then be exhibited in Waitrose café, in Marlborough High Street.

Organiser Philippa Davenport revealed added that the top eight photographs have been made into a set of greetings cards, now on sale for everyone to enjoy, with proceeds benefitting Marlborough Community Orchard.

Charlotte Tickel, aged nine, won a special prize for her photograph spelling out the words Apple Day in apples, a strong image adopted by Marlborough Apple Day 2011 for their poster.

Presenting the prizes, competition sponsor, Juliet Kindersley, of Sheepdrove Organic Farm, declared: "The philosophy and passion behind Marlborough Apple Day mirrors exactly our own commitment to link nature and culture, with local foods for local people at its heart."

Print Email

Now is the time ensure that you don’t lose your vital vote

Canvassers will hit Marlborough doorsteps from this morning (Friday) to give local people across Wiltshire the final chance to register to vote in all forthcoming elections.

Electoral registration forms were sent out to all 200,000 households in the county at the end of August and so far 70 per cent have answered.  The forms were followed by first reminder letters sent to 80,000 properties where the occupants have not yet completed and returned their annual electoral registration form.

Starting this weekend, canvassers will be calling at any properties that have yet to respond, asking householders to complete the form on the doorstep.  Many of the calls will be during the evening and weekends and if residents are not at home they will call again at a later time.

John Watling, head of electoral services at Wiltshire Council told Marlborough News Online: “If people are not registered to vote , then they will not be able to make a decision about who represents them at local, national or European level.”

“People have to complete the annual canvass form so they can help decide who makes the decisions which affect everyday life.”

The purpose of completing the registration form is so that an accurate register of electors can be published on December 1, 2011.   

The council’s trading standards team are reminding people to check for ID before they open their doors.  All legitimate electoral roll canvassers will wear visible identification, and are instructed not to enter any homes.

For more information contact your local electoral registration officer on 0300 456 0112 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit the elections page on the Wiltshire Council website.

Print Email

Marlborough’s mayor gives boost to world’s first children’s hospice

Marlborough's Mayor, Councillor Alexander Kirk Wilson with the Mayoress, Julie Robinson pictured with Jennifer Hudson from Helen & Douglas House

Helen & Douglas House, the world’s first children’s hospice opened in Oxford in 1982, received a visit last week from Marlborough’s mayor, Councillor Alexander Kirk Wilson, who has included the organisation as one of his mayoral charities during his year in office.

The two hospice houses, Helen House for children and Douglas House for young adults, help 15 residents at anyone time, some £3.4 million of their annual expenditure of £8.3 million coming from gifts, donations and legacies.

“Usually about a third of the residents are in for end-of-life care,” explained the mayor, who was accompanied by Marlborough’s mayoress, Julie Robinson.  “It is an immensely moving experience to go there since they concentrate on the quality of life, not the length.”

The mayor and mayoress are pictured with Jennifer Hudson who showed them the hospice at work.

Print Email

More Articles ...

  • MYFC 005
  • Camilla-2012-10-19 152
  • Mop-Fair---10-10-09------08
  • ARK Manton -2012-01-14 49-
  • Bluebells-in-West-Woods-10-05-09------30
  • Marlborough-2013-04-18 St Peters-2
  • Town-Hall-2011-05-03 08-2
  • Landscape
  • Jazz Fest Sat 572
  • Sunset2
  • 4MI-2013-11-28 030
  • Silbury-Sunset---10-06-08-----07-2
  • TdB-Pewsey 044
  • D4S9273
  • IMG 8472-2
  • D812668
  • Torch-2012-05-23 093-
  • IMG 9097-2
  • Big-Bull
  • Duke-of-Kent 086
  • Civic Selfie1
  • Christmas-Lights 15-11-20 097
  • D4S0472
  • Hares 017cropped
  • Xmas-Lights-2011-11-24 10